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OSHA delays electronic reporting requirement start date

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced recently that it intends to delay the initial deadline for compliance with its rule requiring employers to report accident and illness records to OSHA electronically. Under the original deadline, employers with over 250 workers and smaller employers in high hazard industries would have been required to begin electronic filing of certain OSHA-required forms on July 1, 2017. For a more detailed discussion of the electronic recordkeeping rule, go here. That deadline is now off and OSHA has promised a formal notification in the future with more information about revised deadlines.…

Annie get your gun: Expanded rights for Ohio gun owners

Governor Kasich has signed Senate Bill 199, which prohibits employers from creating or enforcing any policy that would limit an employee with a concealed carry license from storing a firearm in the employee’s locked vehicle while on the employer’s premises. The new law, found at O.R.C. 2923.1210 states:

A business entity, property owner, or public or private employer may not establish, maintain, or enforce a policy or rule that prohibits or has the effect of prohibiting a person who has been issued a valid concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm or ammunition when both of the following

New CDL rule offers smoother transition to civilian careers for veterans and opportunity to address driver shortage in transportation industry

The American Trucking Association (ATA) estimates that the for-hire trucking industry faced a driver shortage of nearly 48,000 drivers at the close of 2015. The effects of this shortage can be felt across nearly every sector of the U.S. economy with roughly 70 percent of all freight moving by truck. Industry advocates have noted that even a modest improvement in the economy could increase freight volumes and further exacerbate the shortage.…

OSHA retaliation rules are going forward

On Monday, a federal judge in Texas refused to issue an injunction stopping OSHA from enforcing certain aspects of controversial “non-retaliation” rules. We reported on the proposed OSHA rules on Oct. 27, 2016. Briefly, the most controversial aspects of the rule are on two points:

  1. The rule would effectively prohibit incentive programs under which bonuses or other rewards are conditioned, at least in part, on the frequency of reported injuries. OSHA says that programs like that are a disincentive to reporting injuries.
  2. OSHA takes the position that drug testing programs that call for drug or alcohol testing automatically after an

Decision on whether to block DOL salary basis increase to $47,476 per year expected by Nov. 22

After a hearing in the Eastern District of Texas on a lawsuit by 21 states to enjoin the Department of Labor’s scheduled increase of the minimum salary level for exempt status under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the federal judge hearing the case indicated that he will rule by Nov. 22, 2016. As you know, the rule is set to go into effect on Dec. 1, 2016. For those exempt employees with salaries below $47,476, many employers are weighing whether to implement salary increases up to the new threshold or convert the employees to non-exempt status. Non-exempt status would …

Hidden anti-retaliation provisions in OSHA’s electronic reporting rule: How are incentive programs and drug testing policies affected?

In May 2016, we told you about OSHA’s final rule requiring electronic reporting of illnesses and injuries. This rule requires electronic submission of your OSHA logs, and the information provided will be posted on OSHA’s website. However, in the comments about the new reporting rules OSHA addresses anti-retaliation as it relates to the reporting of illnesses and injuries. The anti-retaliation regulations were originally scheduled to take effect Aug. 10, 2016 and later pushed back to Nov. 1, 2016. A lawsuit has been filed in the Northern District of Texas that could result in the anti-retaliation rules being delayed further …

Ohio’s new law legalizing medical marijuana includes key exceptions for employers

A special thanks to one of our summer clerks, Abigail Chin, for her assistance with this article.

In the wake of Ohio’s new medical marijuana law, you may be thinking, what does it mean for your drug-free workplace policy? Ohio’s new medical marijuana law, H.B. 523, provides targeted exceptions for employers.

Ohio’s law goes into effect in approximately 90 days; however, it is expected that full implementation could take up to two years before the Ohio Department of Commerce, State Medical Board and Board of Pharmacy can establish licensing requirements for growers, processors, testing laboratories, dispensaries and physicians. H.B. 523 …

Managing the heat for employees

Temperatures across the United States are starting to heat up. Employers must be cognizant of the impact these rising temps have on employees who work outside.

First things first. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) put together the following list of symptoms of heat illness and first aid solutions:

  • Sunburn: Redness and pain. In severe cases, swelling of skin, blisters, fever and headaches. Response: Ointments for mild cases if blisters appear and do not break. If breaking occurs, apply dry sterile dressing.
  • Heat cramps: Painful spasms usually in the muscles of legs and abdomen with heavy sweating.

Employers wanting to take full advantage of the Defending Trade Secrets Act should consider including immunity notice in all new and updated confidentiality agreements

As our sister blog, Technology Law Source has reported, on May 11, 2016, President Obama signed into law the Defending Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), which creates a federal trade secret misappropriation cause of action. As noted, businesses have a lot to consider in deciding whether to pursue this new cause of action in federal court when the security of their trade secrets are threatened. Because the DTSA does not pre-empt state laws protecting trade secrets, however, if a federal forum is otherwise appealing, there really is no reason not to pursue a DTSA cause of action.

Employers will be …

OSHA issues final rule requiring electronic submission of workplace illness and injury logs

On May 11, 2016, OSHA issued a final rule requiring electronic reporting of illnesses and injuries. The new rules apply to establishments with 250 or more employees. The rules require electronic submission of the 2016 OSHA form 300A summary report by July 1, 2017, and the 2017 300 log, 300A summary and 301 incident report for 2017 by July 1, 2018. In each subsequent year, all reports for every establishment must be submitted by March 2 of the following year. The new rules also require employers in high-risk industries (construction, manufacturing, furniture stores, waste collection and nursing care facilities) with …

How FMLA works during holidays

Managing FMLA leaves that fall on holidays

Administering the FMLA is difficult. When an FMLA leave falls on a holiday, it becomes even more complicated. Employers must know how to answer three holiday-related questions. First, if a holiday falls during an employee’s FMLA leave, does that holiday count against the employee’s FMLA entitlement? Second, how is the FMLA administered when there is an extended plant, office or school shutdown? Lastly, must an employer provide holiday pay to an employee on FMLA leave?

Does a holiday count against an employee’s FMLA leave entitlement?

While many employers keep track of their employees’ …

EEOC issues guidance directed specifically to HIV positive employees and their physicians

Whether the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is taking advantage of the fact that HIV infection has been in the news lately (thanks to Charlie Sheen’s recent disclosure about his own HIV status) or the timing is pure coincidence, the EEOC earlier this month issued two publications regarding the rights afforded by the Americans with Disabilities Act to job applicants and employees living with HIV. Although the EEOC previously issued a more general guidance about the ADA’s protections for individuals with HIV/AIDS in 2012, these two new publications are notable in that they are specifically directed to HIV positive applicants …

Fantasy sport issues in the workplace

As we enter football season, workforces should prepare for the estimated 25 million fantasy sports enthusiasts who spend at least an hour of work time managing their teams each week during the 13- to 17-week football season. (See more here.)  Distracted employees can reduce productivity, cause workplace accidents, and potentially impact the bottom line. As such, employers that are concerned with such productivity issues should put proper procedures in place to address these issues head on.

The first question of course, however, is are fantasy football leagues even legal? On the federal level, the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act …

Second Circuit rejects DOL test for unpaid internships

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Glatt et al. v. Fox Searchlight Pictures, Inc. recently rejected the Department of Labor (“DOL”) six factor test for determining whether an individual has been properly classified as an unpaid intern in favor of another test that looks at whether the intern or the employer is the primary beneficiary of the relationship.

The DOL’s six factors are:

  1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
  2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;

New app allows consumers to buy based on which companies are female-friendly

Thanks to Summer Associate Christopher Hawthorne for his assistance with this blog entry.

In an era of consumers making choices based on whether companies have ethical labor and sourcing practices, a new app now tracks how female friendly a company is. “Buy Up Index,” reveals whether a company’s workplace policies and practices accommodate and empower its female employees. Through this app, consumers no longer have to rely on the company’s public persona.

The app uses four criteria—women employees, women’s leadership, corporate citizenship, and marketing—to create an overall score that grades the company’s treatment of its female employees. Employers are graded …

Employment law and recent events: Confederate flag unrest

Thanks to Porter Wright Summer Associate Carolyn Alford for her assistance in preparing this blog post.

The recent tragedy in South Carolina, where a reputed white supremacist opened fire on a crowd of Black churchgoers, has propelled the Confederate flag as a symbol of racism back into the public spotlight, after a picture surfaced of the shooter posing with a gun in front of a Confederate flag. The attention the Confederate flag has received nationwide will no doubt be reflected in the workplace as well. But what are an employer’s responsibilities when an employee or manager wants to display the …

U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage – workplace implications

The United States Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges  requiring that all states recognize same-sex marriages is one of the more significant constitutional law decisions from the Court in many years. The impact of the decision extends in some ways to the workplace and to the day-to-day responsibilities of human resource and benefits professionals.

Of course, the immediate impact is the legalization of same-sex marriages in all states, regardless of where the marriage was performed. That means that all spousal privileges associated with employment must be extended to same-sex married couples. Examples include:

  • FMLA: Time off to care for

Workers’ compensation and summer outings

Summertime brings company picnics, charity walks and softball leagues. Great moments for increasing employee morale, but these activities may lead to employer liability if an employee is injured while participating in such activities.

In Ohio, employees injured while engaged in an employer-sponsored recreational or fitness activity are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits unless the employee signed a waiver prior to participating in the activity. Hence, it is critical employers request employees execute a waiver before an activity occurs. The BWC provides a sample waiver on its website.

For the waiver to be valid, the following requirements must be met:…

Hiring minors: Not my teenage dream

It is summer, and you know what that means: teenagers, everywhere. And they are not just hanging out at the mall, they are working at the mall, at the local pool, and in other entry-level positions. Unlike other workers, however, teenagers come with their own special set of complications. Generational issues aside, the real concern for employers with employment of minors is complying with federal and state laws specific to employment of minors.

Hiring

Before hiring minors, each employer should verify whether it can hire minor employees in the industry in which the employer operates and the state in which …

Summer dress codes: The long and skorts of it

For many, summer is a more laid-back time of year and rightfully so. There are summer holidays for people to enjoy, vacations, long weekends, lazy days outside taking advantage of the nice weather and, in the employment law area, many law-making and law-enforcing bodies are less active or not in session. Sometimes this laid-back attitude seeps into the workplace. Specifically, during these hot, sticky summer months, employers often notice employees start taking a relaxed approach the office dress code. It makes sense; the rising temperatures make some people reach for shorter hemlines or lighter-weight fabrics. Many times this can be …

Managing religious holidays

Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination and/or harassment on the basis of religion. This means that an employer cannot treat persons of different religions differently or appear to favor one religion over another. As such, employers should be mindful of varying cultural differences among their employees. While their are not as many religious holidays during the summer months, during 2015, the month of Ramadan is celebrated by Muslims from June 17 – July 16.  During this period, Muslims must fast between sunrise and sunset. Keeping that in mind, the following tips may serve as helpful reminders to employers:

  • Keep décor

Hiring seasonal workers during the summer

One issue that comes up for many employers in the summer is hiring seasonal workers. Hiring temporary seasonal employees presents some substantial legal traps for the unwary. Employers should assess their seasonal hiring practices to ensure compliance with various state and federal laws. In other posts, we advised you on the issues in hiring interns and minors, but here are some other issues employers should look out for when hiring seasonal workers:

  • Verify employees are legally permitted to work in the U.S.
  • Make sure you are following the rules when classifying a seasonal worker as an “independent contractor” versus an

Sixth Circuit in EEOC v. Ford: Sometimes showing up really is an essential function of the job

Almost a year ago, we wrote that a panel of the Sixth Circuit in EEOC v. Ford Motor Company, bucking the trend elsewhere, had held that an employer could be required to permit an employee to work from home as a reasonable accommodation for a disability. Last week, however, the entire Sixth Circuit, in an 8-5 decision, issued an opinion overturning the panel’s decision and finding that in-person attendance at the work site is generally an essential function of most jobs, particularly those that are interactive. The court recognized that advances in technology may mean that regular on-site …

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