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Employer Law Report

Tag Archives: S

Court Denies Employer’s Access to Social Media Posts in FLSA Collective Action and Sends Warning: If You Want Access to Social Media, Come with Both Barrels Loaded … Leave the Water Gun at Home

Posted in Employment Class & Collective Actions, Wage & Hour

A federal court has denied a defendant-employer’s request that plaintiffs sift through and turn over all their social media posts made during their work hours in an FLSA collective action in which the plaintiffs claim their employer failed to give them meal breaks. How did that happen? I thought you’d never ask.

By way of background, Jewell v. Aaron’s Inc., is a nationwide,1,700+ FLSA collective action pending in the Northern District of Georgia. In the suit (Complaint accessible here), the class plaintiffs (current and former employees of Aaron’s) claim they were not paid for their 30-minute meal periods. …


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Social Media Firing of the Week. (Final Score: God 10 – Waitress 0)

Posted in Employment Outtakes, Traps for the Unwary, Workforce Strategies, Workplace Privacy

The Internet is burning up this morning with the story of an Applebee’s waitress who was fired for posting on Reddit, a social news and entertainment site, the receipt from a customer who gave her no tip on a $35.00 check, writing "I give God 10% why do you get 18?" Unfortunately, the waitress did not obscure the customer’s signature when she posted a picture of the receipt, which naturally set off a firestorm of Reddit users and others on the Internet attempting to identify the customer. The customer apparently then contacted Applebee’s and demanded the waitress’s termination.

While there …


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ADA Amendments Act Passed by House and Senate; President Expected to Sign Bill

Posted in EEO

On Wednesday, September 17, by voice vote, the House of Representatives approved the Senate version of the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) (S.3406), which the Senate had unanimously approved last week. The White House immediately issued a statement that President Bush looks forward to signing the bill into law. Once signed, the ADAAA will take effect on January 1, 2009.

The Senate bill differed slightly from the previously passed House version. For employers, the most significant difference between the two bills is the decision to eliminate a definition for “substantially limits,” which was included in the House bill. Instead, the new bill directs the …


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