For some, snowflakes bring thoughts of snowmen and sleigh rides. For others, they signal the beginning of closed business days, employees arriving late to work, and all sorts of other issues—all the result of inclement weather! This post takes a look at some of the common headaches that bad weather causes for employers and how

OFCCP issued proposed updated rules on sex discrimination for federal contractors covered by EO 11246. They will be officially published tomorrow. Contractors and interested parties can submit comments until March 31, 2015.

The proposed rules largely align with the obligations already imposed by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which applies to most employers,

Many employers hire seasonal workers during the holidays to help keep up with increased consumer demand. However, hiring temporary seasonal employees presents some substantial legal traps for the unwary. Employers should assess their seasonal hiring practices to ensure compliance with various state and federal laws. In other posts, we advised you on the issues in

Relying on Ohio’s public policy favoring workplace safety, the Tenth District Court of Appeals in Blackburn v. American Dental Centers, et al. recently concluded that evidence that employees were terminated for complaining about work conditions and practices that were unsafe to both the employees and patients of a dental office may support a claim

The Office of Federal Contacts Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has been very busy changing the rules for federal contractors and subcontractors. There are 8 new developments from the second half of 2014 that all covered contractors should be aware of:

  1. Final rule prohibiting discrimination against sexual orientation and gender identity for federal contractors subject to Executive

Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE/Getty Images & Mark Duncan/AP Images

As the NBA Season gets ready to tip off, Cleveland is certainly ready. The return of LeBron James to the Cleveland Cavaliers has riveted the sports world and reinvigorated Cleveland. But for employers, this “going home” phenomenon has prompted conversations of boomerang employees

Recently, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced a final rule changing requirements for reporting severe injuries and fatalities. The rule also modifies OSHA’s exemptions from its record-keeping requirements. The new rule takes effect January 1, 2015.

In most circumstances, there is no obligation to notify OSHA when there is an injury or