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Nikki is an associate attorney in the firm’s labor and employment group. She works with clients to advise on various labor and employment matters. Nikki counsels clients regarding compliance with both state and federal employment laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

The dust is still settling after the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued its long anticipated final Rule on Tuesday, April 23 banning most non-compete agreements in the employment context. Although the effectiveness of the Rule is likely to be delayed, potentially for years, by court challenges, employers are understandably jittery about their existing non-compete agreements and other restrictive covenants.  Here with answers to some of the most commonly asked questions are Porter Wright employment attorneys Jennifer Huelskamp and Nicole MayoContinue Reading Answers to common questions about the FTC’s non-compete ban: What’s next?

In a decision issued Feb. 21, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) set a new precedent regarding confidentiality provisions. The McLaren Macomb case involved furloughed employees that were offered a severance agreement containing non-disparagement language that prohibited them from making negative statements about the employer. The agreement also contained a confidentiality provision that prohibited the employees from discussing the terms of the agreement itself.Continue Reading NLRB targets confidentiality provisions in severance agreements

The legal and mainstream media is still abuzz following the Federal Trade Commission’s Jan. 5, 2023, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would ban all employee non-compete agreements nationwide. And earlier this month, a bipartisan Senate bill was introduced (the Workforce Mobility Act of 2023, sponsored by U.S. Senators Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.)) that also would ban non-competes across the board (except, as in the FTC’s proposal, in connection with the sale of a business). But comments made by President Biden in his Feb. 7 State of the Union Address signal that a more measured approach focused on banning non-competes for low-wage workers may ultimately be what becomes law.Continue Reading Biden State of the Union signals measured approach on non-compete ban

On Jan. 5, 2023, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a slate of proposed rulemaking. Of interest to employers in particular is a proposed rule that would completely ban the use of non-competition or non-compete agreements, which prevent employees from working for a competitor or starting a competing business. Typically, these agreements often last months or years and are limited to a certain geographic scope. The FTC noted that it believes non-compete agreements often have the effect of lowering workers’ wages.Continue Reading FTC announces proposed rule prohibiting non-compete agreements

COVID-19 has presented employers with leave challenges not only for those currently suffering from COVID-19, but also for employees who have lingering residual symptoms, sometimes referred to as “long COVID.” While the effects of routine COVID-19 cases often have a limited impact on the workplace, more difficult accommodation issues can result from long COVID.
Continue Reading Long COVID implications under FMLA and ADA

We recently reported that the Senate passed a #MeToo bill that banned the use of mandatory arbitration agreements for sexual harassment and sexual assault claims. This bill was signed into law by President Biden on March 3, 2022. On March 17, 2022, the House took it a step further and voted 222-209 to pass the Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal Act (H.R. 963).
Continue Reading House passes bill banning mandatory arbitration agreements

Medical marijuana is being legalized in an increasing number of states, which will have an impact on a variety of employment issues, including workers’ compensation. The Supreme Court appears to be considering providing clarity to employers and employees alike regarding payment for medical marijuana in workers’ compensation claims.
Continue Reading Supreme Court considering granting certiorari in workers’ compensation medical marijuana cases