Employer Law Report

Tag Archives: accommodation

Kentucky’s new pregnancy accommodation law goes into effect

Kentucky recently enacted the Pregnant Workers Act, which amends the Kentucky Civil Rights Act to provide accommodations to pregnant and lactating employees. The law goes into effect on June 27, 2019. Below are the important implications of the Pregnant Workers Act, which will affect employers that operate or maintain business locations in Kentucky.

Who does the law cover?

Covered employers are those that employ 15 or more persons during 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year. Employees limited by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, including lactation, are eligible for reasonable accommodations under this …

Is your online application process a risk?

Do you solicit and accept employment applicants electronically? If so, assume a potential applicant has physical or other disabilities making it difficult for him or her to apply. Do you have a risk under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, or under Ohio or other disability discrimination laws? You may.…

Fourth Circuit Rejects EEOC Position That Supreme Court Cleveland Decision Does Not Apply To Enforcement Actions

In 1999, in Cleveland v. Policy Mgmt. Sys. Corp., the U.S. Supreme Court held that in order to avoid summary judgment in a disability discrimination case brought under the ADA, a plaintiff must provide a "sufficient" explanation regarding any conflicting statements made in a Social Security disability application.  According to the Supreme Court, that explanation must be "sufficient to warrant a reasonable juror’s concluding that, assuming the truth of, or the plaintiff’s good-faith belief in, the earlier statement, the plaintiff could nonetheless ‘perform the essential functions’ of her job, with or without ‘reasonable accommodation.’"

Last week, in EEOC v. Greater

Verizon Consent Decree Provides Road Map For Surviving EEOC Scrutiny of No Fault Attendance and Leave of Absence Policies

On July 6, 2011, the EEOC announced a settlement with Verizon of a nationwide class action lawsuit alleging that Verizon violated the ADA by refusing to make exceptions to its “no fault” attendance plans to accommodate employees with disabilities. According to the EEOC’s press release, Verizon violated the ADA by failing to provide reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities, such as making an exception to its attendance plans for individuals whose “chargeable absences” were caused by their disabilities. Instead, the EEOC said, the company disciplined or terminated employees who needed such accommodations. In addition to requiring the payment of …

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