The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has again released a new and updated version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification document. Since November 1986, all U.S. employers have been required to complete and retain the Form I-9 for new employees. Effective January 31, 2020, employers should use the new Form I-9, available online in PDF format. The latest version of the Form I-9 is mandatory as of May 1, 2020, and it replaces the prior version in use since September 2018. You can identify the new version of the form by the date (10/21/2019) noted at the bottom-left corner; the prior version was dated 07/17/2017-N. Although employers may use the prior version up to April 30, USCIS recommends using the updated form for any new employees hired on or after January 31, 2020.

Continue Reading Employer Alert: revised Form I-9 effective January 31, 2020

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is again releasing a new and updated version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification document. Since November 1986, all U.S. employers have been required to complete and retain the I-9 for new employees. The most recent version of the form went into effect on Jan. 22, 2017, but, for some unknown reason, USCIS is now issuing another version. This new version will be mandatory as of Sept. 18, 2017. The easiest way to identify the new form is by the date (07/17/17) noted in the bottom left corner; the prior version was dated 11/14/2016.

A couple of points to bear in mind:

  1. The new I-9 must be used for any new employees hired on or after Sept. 18, 2017. There is no need to complete the new form for any current employees, and employers should continue to follow existing storage and retention rules for all of their previously completed Forms I-9.
  2. The new form has the same expiration date as the prior version—08/31/2019—so employers should be careful to use the proper version of the form with 07/17/17 noted in the bottom left corner.


Continue Reading Employer alert: Revised I-9 form required beginning Sept. 18, 2017

USCIS recently released a revised version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification document. Since November 1986, all U.S. employers have been required to complete and retain the I-9 for all new employees. Employers may continue using the I-9 form dated March 8, 2013 until Jan. 22, 2017, when the use of the revised form becomes mandatory. It remains a 3 page form, but there are minor revisions, including a separate supplemental page for a preparer/translator and an “additional information” box on page 2, but there is also a new user-friendly online PDF “smart” version of the form available at http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-9.pdf.

Continue Reading Employer alert: Revised I-9 Form required beginning Jan. 22, 2017

On Aug. 13, 2012, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that the most recent version of Form I-9 remains valid notwithstanding the OMB expiration date of Aug. 31, 2012 (located in the upper right hand corner on the form). Until further notice, the current form, which was last revised on Aug. 7, 2009 (located

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On August 19, 2009, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it was rescinding its August 2007 and October 2008 regulatory amendments concerning actions employers can take to benefit from "safe harbor" protection after receiving notification from DHS or the Social Security Administration that an employee’s reported work authorization or Social Security information does not match government records. In October 2007 a U.S. District Court in California preliminarily enjoined implementation of the regulations. Under the revised regulations, if employers took certain actions within prescribed timeframes, they could shield themselves from liability for allegedly employing individuals who lacked authorization to work in the United States. For additional information on the revised regulation, please review prior blog postings on this topic. 


Continue Reading U.S. Department of Homeland Security Rescinds Safe Harbor Regulation for Employers That Receive “No Match” Letters