Employer Law Report

Tag Archives: right-to-work

The door may be open for county or municipal government “right-to-work” laws in Ohio

Right-to-work laws limit the “union security” a union can achieve in a collective bargaining agreement with an employer. In states with no right-to-work law, unions can bargain for contract provisions requiring that, as a condition of continued employment, employees must either join the union or at least pay monthly fees to the union for its collective bargaining efforts. In states that have right-to-work laws, that sort of union security provision is illegal. There are 26 states with right-to-work laws currently. Ohio does not have a right-to-work law.…

Don’t Expect Any New Right-to-Work Legislation in Ohio…Until Perhaps After 2014

First it was Wisconsin. Then Indiana. Then Michigan of all places. Right-to-work legislation is being considered, and in some cases passed, by legislatures throughout the Rust Belt. Given that trend, and the economic benefits to businesses and the state that follow with right-to-work, it was only a matter of time before regional pressures led the Ohio legislature to consider the idea notwithstanding the previously failed attempts on Senate Bill 5.

Just recently, two Ohio House of Representatives members, Kristina Roegner (R-Hudson) and Ron Maag (R-Lebanon), announced they are sponsoring bills that would enact right-to-work for both the public and private …

Poll Says Ohioans Support “Right-to-Work” Law

The Columbus Dispatch reported on February 14, 2012 that a majority of Ohioans responding to a recent poll believe Ohio should become a "right-to-work" state. In most respects, federal law, not state law, governs collective bargaining and union membership. But, "right-to-work" legislation is one area in which states have successfully regulated union rights. Many collective bargaining agreements (CBA’s) require that an employee become at least a "financial member" of a union – meaning the employee must pay regular union dues, fees, and assessments in order to keep his or her job. In a "right-to-work" state, it is illegal for a …

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