Employer Law Report

Tag Archives: noncompete

Ohio Supreme Court Partially Reverses its Acordia Non-Compete Decision

This past May, we reported that the Ohio Supreme Court ruled in Acordia of Ohio, L.L.C. v. Fishel that following a merger, the surviving company may not be able to enforce employees’ non-compete agreements, where the agreements failed to contain an assignment clause, and the time period of the employees’ non-competes began to run as of the date of the merger. The Court reconsidered its decision, and issued a new decision today. Upon quick review, the bottom line seems to be that the Court has decided that it mis-read earlier precedent regarding corporate mergers. Here is part of the

Ohio Supreme Court Rules On The Enforcement of Non-Compete Agreements By The Surviving Company In A Merger

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on May 24, 2012, that following a merger the surviving company may not be able to enforce employees’ non-compete agreements where the agreements fail to contain an assignment clause and the time period of the employees’ non-competes began to run as of the date of the merger.

In Acordia of Ohio, L.L.C. v. Fishel et al., the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that a merger causes the original corporate party to non-compete agreements to cease to exist, while the surviving company takes ownership of the agreements. But where the non-compete agreement fails to contain …

Ohio Supreme Court to Address Assignability of Noncompetes During Mergers and Acquisitions

Yesterday the Ohio Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal that addresses the extent to which a corporate merger may impact the surviving company’s ability to enforce restrictive covenants that its predecessor companies entered into with their employees.

In Acordia of Ohio LLC v. Fishel et al., several Acordia employees (called the "Fishel team") left the company in 2005 and began working with a competitor, Neace-Lukens. These employees had previously signed noncompete agreements with Acordia’s predecessor companies, prohibiting them from competing with the predecessors for two years after termination. They did not sign new agreements with the surviving company. …

LexBlog